For Our Septuagint Project, How Did We Handle the So-Called “Double Texts”?

In this post, we elaborate on how we handled the few books of the Greek OT (and apocrypha) that apparently circulated in two somewhat distinct textual forms.

Septuaginta: A Reader's Edition

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As is well known in the field of Septuagint studies, certain books developed over time into distinct textual forms. That is, in some cases there are what look like two different Greek versions of the same book in the Septuagint corpus. In such cases, the manuscript evidence preserves two textual traditions that are substantially different enough that Rahlfs decided to differentiate them in his edition of the Septuagint.* Since we decided to use Rahlfs-Hanhart as a base text, when it came to producing the Reader’s Edition we had to ask ourselves how we would handle these “double texts,” as they are often called.

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OT Metaphors and Luke’s Christology: Published Thesis

In a couple weeks the published form of my PhD dissertation will be released by T&T Clark as part of the Library of New Testament Studies series.

Though I finished the dissertation version almost two years ago, it has taken a while (longer than I expected) to navigate the publication process. I’m excited to note that the release date is just a couple weeks away.

Continue reading OT Metaphors and Luke’s Christology: Published Thesis

A Note on How We Devised the Vocab Aids for our Septuagint Reader’s Edition

Will Ross on how we went about constructing the vocabulary apparatus for our LXX Reader’s Edition. Including a fancy chart that I no longer know how to explain even though I did it, as well as a short sample from Exodus.

Septuaginta: A Reader's Edition

Probably the most obvious question to ask about a reader’s edition is “What vocabulary do you provide?” After all, that is the basic function of this kind of book—to supply the reader with guidance on the form and meaning of difficult vocabulary.

So obviously that’s what we did.

But how did we define “difficult vocabulary” for Septuaginta? It was actually a pretty tricky issue to address. Let me explain.

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On the Byzantine Tradition, Minuscules, and Textual Criticism in the Past Few Decades

Last year I began work on an extended research project involving the ‘later’ manuscripts of the Greek New Testament. This all started with an invitation from Peter Gurry and Elijah Hixson (buddies of mine from England) to contribute to their upcoming volume, Myths and Mistakes: Correcting Common Misconceptions about the Text of the New Testament (IVP Academic).

The firstfruits of this project took the form of a presentation I made at ETS this past November. Today the second installment of some of the output of this project was published in Currents in Biblical Research (Vol 16/3, pp. 263–308).

Continue reading On the Byzantine Tradition, Minuscules, and Textual Criticism in the Past Few Decades

Why Did We Choose Rahlfs-Hanhart as the Basis for this Reader’s Edition?

The latest from our Septuaginta: A Reader’s Edition blog, where we explain how we went about choosing the textual basis for our edition.

Septuaginta: A Reader's Edition

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One of the first decisions we faced in scoping out this project was this: which Greek text should we use?

There were essentially four options on the table:

  1. H. B. Swete’s ‘smaller’ Cambridge edition from the late 1800s–early 1900s
  2. Brooke/McLean/Thackeray’s ‘larger’ Cambridge critical edition
  3. The semi-critical Septuaginta edited by Alfred Rahlfs and revised by Robert Hanhart (a.k.a. Rahlfs-Hanhart)
  4. The Göttingen critical edition

The first option is in the public domain and available electronically (e.g., here), which was a plus, but all agree it has been supplanted by others. The second option is also publically available (e.g., here) but unfortunately the original project was never completed.

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15 Things Seminary Teaches Me that My Busy Pastor(ate) Can’t

Abridged version now available at TGC


Friends over at The Gospel Coalition have been promoting a new book, 15 Things Seminary Couldn’t Teach Me, for several weeks. They have also featured videos of big-name pastors sharing about the things they could only learn in day-to-day ministry, not in seminary.

As a seminary professor and a churchman, I fully understand that seminaries don’t ‘make’ pastors, nor do they equip would-be pastors, missionaries, etc. with everything they need to thrive in ministry. Neither do medical schools, law schools, and so forth.

But I’m not sure seminaries have ever claimed that, nor have other professional schools.

Continue reading 15 Things Seminary Teaches Me that My Busy Pastor(ate) Can’t

On the Strange Order(s) of the Murder-Adultery-Steal Commandments


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See discussion of this further over at Evangelical Textual Criticismhttp://evangelicaltextualcriticism.blogspot.com/2018/04/greg-lanier-locating-inspired-original.html


During the Spring 2017 term at RTS-O, I taught an elective called “Septuagint Readings.” Each week ~14 students gathered to read various portions of the Greek OT. During one of the classes, I was struck with something I had seen before but not really internalized: the variations in the ordering of the 6th, 7th, and 8th commandments in Greek Exodus 20, Greek Deuteronomy 5, and the Hebrew behind the ESV/NIV/etc. None of them matched. I began to probe this…and one thing led to another, and this inquiry turned into an article that was recently published in the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society (61.1).

Continue reading On the Strange Order(s) of the Murder-Adultery-Steal Commandments

Connecting Biblical Scholarship to the Church